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Traidcraft

Traidcraft- Fighting poverty through trade

We have had a Traidcraft stall at St Margarets for over twenty years.

Traidcraft is a fair trade organisation established in 1979 by Christians whose aim is to fight poverty through trade. It works with producers in the developing world who:

  • pay fair wages
  • provide better working conditions
  • are organised primarily for the benefit of their workers.

Fair trade cuts out the middlemen and ensures that more of the money you pay reaches the poor who produce the goods. Traidcraft has campaigned to make Fairtrade products available in the supermarkets and now Fairtrade marked food products make up 1% of the UK shopping basket. So, with Fairtrade products on the shelves of every supermarket and every corner shop- -job done?

Well, no actually.

Traidcraft is committed to work with the poorer, most marginalized producers to give them a foothold into the Fairtrade market that would not otherwise be available to them. It develops sustainable businesses and business communities. It uses its influence to change the rules of trade and make them work for the poor. Traidcraft can make a difference to producers, their families and their communities. The extra money you pay for Traidcraft goods goes to the producers.

For example Patricia Mutangili is a Kenyan tea farmer, known as Mama Fairtrade. She recently purchased four beehives bought with the Fairtrade premium and tended by factory workers. On the second day after the bee hives were installed the bees came in droves and factory staff have already harvested 120 kilos of honey, which has been sold to the community. They plan to use the money to double the number of hives and hope to use the money from future harvests to launch a savings and credit scheme for factory staff.

Every purchase you make at our stall has an effect on the person who produced it. Buying from our parish stall is a clearway of showing our commitment to justice in trade and to the people of the developing world.

We would therefore like to ask you to support us in two ways.

  • Keep buying our fairly traded goods whenever possible.
  • Volunteer to help out on the stall, either regularly or on a one off basis in case of someone dropping out at the last minute.

If you can help in any way please contact the people below or make yourself known to someone on the stall. Thank-you.

Tabs